What you need to know about the Gemini meteorite is set to reach its annual peak – Science

Geminid meteor shower in 2019

The famous Gemini meteor shower will sling bright shooting stars, reaching the shower annual peak on the night of December 13th and 14th, which is similar to the new moon. According to known records, Geminids are about 200 years old, and each year is considered the best meteor shower because individual meteorites are brighter and faster. In 2019, as there is an almost full moon, Geminids will only see 20 to 30 meteors per hour.

Here’s what you need to know about the Gemini meteorite:

Where do they come from?

Geminids are associated with the near-Earth object 3200 Python, which produces a stream of particles flowing into the Earth – an asteroid that could have collided with another object in the distant past. The asteroid 3200 Python, which orbits the Sun once every 1.4 years, has a long comet-like orbit. The Gemini meteor shower occurs every year as the Earth passes through the debris left by the asteroid’s path.

How do you see them?

Geminids emerge from bright galaxies. To find Gemini in the northern hemisphere, look in the southwestern sky for the hunter-gatherer Orion constellation. Look to the left of Orion to see the tall Gemini in the southwest sky. In the southern hemisphere, Gemini appears in the lower right of Orion. Meteors appear to be flowing from Gemini, but they can also appear across the sky. If you look a little further away from Gemini, you can see meteorites with long “tails” when you look at them.

When will you see them?

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With no interference from the moonlight, Sky Watchers can see 60 to 120 meteorites per hour in the afternoon and night, as the meteorites can be seen from 2 a.m. to 9-10 p.m.

How to get the best view?

You do not need binoculars or telescopes to see the meteorite, only your naked eyes.

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