US Coroner: With Covid-19 cases, most of the US is heading in the wrong direction again

US Coroner: With Covid-19 cases, most of the US is heading in the wrong direction again

In 31 states, the number of new Kovid-19 cases increased by at least 10% last week compared to the previous week, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University.

Only four states, Delaware, Hawaii, Louisiana and Michigan, saw a decline of more than 10 percent. Fifteen states are stable, including Alaska, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Washington.

According to the Kovid Tracking Project, test positivity rates – the percentage of new test results – are increasing in 25 states.

Doctors feared it would happen in the weeks following Labor Day, said Dr. John A. Snyder, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health. Ashish said.

“Two weeks ago, when we went into Labor Day, we were talking about exactly that – and coming out of Labor Day, as we saw it after Memorial Day and July 4th, we’ll see one more increase,” he said.

“Unfortunately, the weather is going to be a cold fall. We’ve going to spend more time indoors. So now we do not want to be a country.”

Gary Herbert said Utah created a record 1,117 cases on Friday. Herbert Utah’s emergency has been extended to October 20.

Wisconsin reported new cases – 2,533 on Friday. Health officials told people to stay indoors, at least 6 feet away from people outside the home, and to wear masks in public.

More than 6.7 million people worldwide are infected with the corona virus, according to Johns Hopkins University. As of 3:45 p.m., more than 199,400 people had died on Sunday.

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A well-functioning state says to continue testing

But some states are making steady progress. On Sunday, Maryland announced a new record low test positivity rate of 1.89%. There is more good news.

The current total number of hospitals has dropped from 300 to 281 for the first time since March 30, according to the government’s Larry Hogan office. “68 ICU beds are in use – ICU level drops below 70 for the first time since March 26.”

Many health experts say Extensive testing Is the key to finding out Asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic carriersSo those people can isolate and prevent the virus from spreading.
In Maryland, state officials “continue to encourage all Marylanders to test COVID-19” One of 210 testing sites in the state.

The study found further links between pandemic and mental health

As Covid-19 intensified in the US, levels of stress and depression increased, according to a study published in the journal Science Advances.

A study of more than 6,500 people found that several factors may exacerbate people’s stress.

A Trump administration official urges people to wear masks: & quot;  Biology is free from politics & quot;

The greatest risk factor for depressive symptoms is a pre-pandemic mental health diagnosis, the researchers found.

But the symptoms of stress and depression are linked to personal exposure rather than general prevalence – “Concerns about getting sick outweigh concerns about pandemic-related disruptions in everyday life,” the researchers said.

“About a quarter (23.5%) of the sample reported that they or someone nearby had revealed COVID-19 (e.g. experienced symptoms detected),” the researchers wrote in a report published Friday.

Employment also found that those who lose their jobs suffer the most.

“Data indicate that people who continue to work in the early stages of the epidemic are less likely to develop depression than those who do not work, although the risk of contracting the virus is much higher.” The researchers said.

Those who remain as “essential” workers may have given new meaning to the work of responders who have reduced their risk of depression. “

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Another aspect of pandemic stress was how often participants exposed conflicting information from the news and social media, the researchers said.

People immersed themselves in the news for an average of seven hours a day, they found, and over time the intense stress increased.

But consistent, accurate and reliable news reports may be the best way to manage stress, the researchers commented.

Why black, Hispanic Americans suffer more

Not everyone has the urge to work from home. As many minorities have jobs facing the public, this epidemic has particularly affected them.

Black Americans affected by the epidemic say they also face racial inequality

“American Indians, Alaskan natives and African Americans are hospitalized 3.5 times higher than whites,” said U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said.

“Hospitalization rates are three times higher for Hispanics than for whites.”

It exposes pandemic health inequalities and structural conditions, the Surgeon General said.

Social distance and teleworking are crucial to prevent the spread of the corona virus, yet only one in five African Americans and six Hispanic Americans can work, which allows him to work from home, ”Adams said.

People of color are more likely to live in “densely populated urban areas” and multi-generational homes. They are more likely to use public transportation, he said.

“The combination of these and other factors makes it more vulnerable to the spread of highly contagious diseases such as Kovid-19.”

CNN’s Gregory Lemos and Lauren Mascarenhas contributed to this report.

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