Russia: Sevastopol Attack Drones Used “Grain Corridor” | Europe | D.W.

Russia: Sevastopol Attack Drones Used "Grain Corridor" |  Europe |  D.W.

The Russian Defense Ministry assured this Sunday (10.30.2022) that it had recovered the remains of drones that attacked its ships in the Ukrainian city of Sevastopol, which Russia illegally seized in 2014, stating that the devices used the so-called “” “Corridor grain”, the security zone in the Black Sea is set aside for the export of Ukrainian grain.

Marine drones moved into a safe area of ​​the “grain corridor,” the Russian ministry said without providing evidence, adding that at least one of the devices “could have been launched from a civilian ship chartered by Kiev” to export agricultural products from ports in Ukraine by their Western masters.

Moscow claimed that some of the planes had “Canadian-made navigation modules”. He added that “the results of reading the memory recovered from a navigation receiver made it possible to establish that the launch of marine drones took place on the coast near the city of Odessa.”

A worried Guterres

Russia, whose drones have daily bombed Ukrainian civilian facilities, decided to pull out of a UN-brokered deal to export grain from Ukraine via the Black Sea after the attack. According to the Kremlin, the Ukrainians planned the operation with the help of British specialists, which both European countries denied.

Nine aerial and seven marine drones were used in the raid against Sevastopol, all of which were destroyed by defense systems, according to Moscow, while it admitted damage to ships such as a minesweeper.

On his part, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres expressed concern over the slowdown in maritime exports. Guterres delayed his trip to the Arab League summit to focus on the grain issue, his spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

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DZC (EFE, AFP)

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