Relatives of the children’s author (James & Giant Peach, Charlie & the Chocolate Factory) apologize for his anti-Semitism | Jewish Press – JewPress.com | David Israel | 20 Kislev 5781 – December 6, 2020

Relatives of the children's author (James & Giant Peach, Charlie & the Chocolate Factory) apologize for his anti-Semitism |  Jewish Press - JewPress.com |  David Israel |  20 Kislev 5781 - December 6, 2020

Photo credit: Rob Bogertz / Anepho via Wikimedia

On October 12, 1988, Roald Dahl signed a book on child worship in Amsterdam.

The books of Roald Dahl, a British novelist, short story writer, poet, screenwriter and wartime war pilot, have sold more than 250 million copies worldwide. They include the titles you have lovingly given to your children, and perhaps plan for this Chanukah (other vacation): James and Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, The Magician, Fantastic Mr. Fox, BFG, The Tweets, and George.

Now, Dal’s relatives felt the need to issue the following Apologies For the man who abandoned these millions of people who inherited another dark legacy that died in 1990:

Apologies for the anti-Semitic comments made by Roald Dahl

The Dal family and the Roald Doll Story Company apologize for the persistent and understandable harassment caused by some of Roald Doll’s statements. Those prejudicial references are incomprehensible to us, completely different from the man we know and the values ​​at the heart of Royal Doll’s stories, which have positively influenced young people for generations. We hope that it will help Roald Doll to be reminded of the lasting impact of words, at best, at worst.

Here’s what we know (we went to the wiki, so you do not have to:

In 1983, Dahl reviewed Tony Clifton’s Godcride, a book about Israel ‘s siege of West Beirut during the 1982 Lebanese war, suggesting that there would never have been “a people” before – who “became victims of such brutal massacres after the Holocaust.” The infamous man said, “I am not anti-Semitic. I am anti-Israel, ”but his anti-Semitism was evident when he said that the United States“ dominates the big Jewish financial institutions, ”and they do not dare to defy Israel.

According to a later report, the editor of the Literary Review who worked on the original copy used “Israel” instead of “Jews” and “Israeli” instead of “Jew”. Protest. Anyway, it happened because the boy was an unrepentant anti-Semitic.

In 1983, Dal told a reporter: “Jewish behavior has a hostile nature, perhaps a lack of compassion for non-Jews. I mean there is always a reason to grow crops anywhere, as opposed to anything; Not even a stink like Hitler chose them for no reason. ”

Poor Hitler, look at what those Jews did to him.

In an interview with The Independent in 1990, Dal Israel began to hate the Jews after the Lebanese invasion: “They killed 22,000 civilians when they bombed Beirut. It was widely circulated in the press, mainly because it was owned by Jews. I’m definitely anti-Israel, and I’m anti-Semitic as long as you get a Jew who strongly supports Zionism in another country like England. ”

The number of civilians generally accepted in the conflict between Israel and the PLO ranges from 4,500 to 5,000.

In 2014, the Royal Mint decided not to make a coin to commemorate the centenary of Doll’s birth, as he was “considered anti-Semitic and not a high-profile author.”

In his 1994 novel “Rolled Doll: A Biography”, Jeremy Treglon wrote about Doll’s first novel, “Sometime Never” (1948): As the mourning begins, Meatbane runs downstairs to the large safe where his money was kept, opens it and crawls to the lowest shelf, where he lies like a hibernating hedgehog until everything is clear. ”

[In1945Doll’sshortstory”MadameRosette”describesthetitlecharacterasa”dirtyoldSyrianJew”[1945ൽഡാളിന്റെ“മാഡംറോസെറ്റ്”എന്നചെറുകഥയിൽടൈറ്റിൽകഥാപാത്രത്തെ“വൃത്തികെട്ടപഴയസിറിയൻജൂതൻ”എന്നാണ്വിശേഷിപ്പിക്കുന്നത്

Dahl’s anti-Semitism began long before the 1982 Israeli bombings.

It is certain that Dahl did not hate only the Jews. At the Clan Christmas show, om mopa-lumpas from a chocolate factory may be wearing black faces. Dahl hated not only Syrian Jews, but many women. The Magician offers a lot of feminist intricacies. “Witches” are horrible creatures, and so are women.

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