New research: Celebrate your happiness for a quick response

New research: Celebrate your happiness for a quick response

Screaming is a way of expressing emotions. Sacha Froholz, a professor of neuroscience, and his colleagues at the University of Zurich wondered if we would respond differently to different types of complaints. Out of intense desire, they started a study and the result surprised them.

We humans respond more quickly to cries of joy and happiness than to anger, fear, and pain.

– Previous research shows that through evolution the human brain is ready to respond very quickly to negative things such as fear and anger. But we found it to be the other way around, says Sacha Froholes.

We have six different cries

The researchers began their study by classifying the causes of people crying. They found that through crying we express six different emotions and these can be divided into two categories. Intimidation, it is anger, fear, pain, and what is not intimidation is sadness, joy, and happiness.

Happiness is easy to recognize

In the study, the researchers played different cries, and needed to decide which category matched the cries they heard. It was easy for them to recognize the frightening cries.

The researchers allowed subjects to hear cries while studying their brain functions. There, too, they could see that the brain was responding quickly to cries of joy and happiness.

Helps us to create social bonds

Researchers do not know exactly what this might mean, but believe it has something to do with the fact that it’s important for people to be part of a group.

– We can specify, but people often live in a safe and secure environment. Positive emotions are just as important as interacting with others, says Sacha Froholes.

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Researchers also believe that you often experience positive cries when you are involved with yourself, for example when your favorite team scores goals.

– It builds social relationships, says Sasha Fraholes.

The study was published in Plos Biology.

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