New facility to help researchers analyze geographical makeup of Ireland – latest news

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The Trinity Research Center will be open to researchers and other geographical and environmental groups throughout the island.

Geological Survey Ireland and Trinity College Dublin today (June 23) launch a new national facility for Irish geoscientists providing state-of-the-art chemical analysis.

The University-based Earth Surface Research Laboratory (ESRL) has extensive facilities for the preparation and analysis of geographical and environmental samples.

It consists of two X-ray fluorescence spectrometers, which can be used to determine the concentration of the element. It will include instruments for measuring the amount of mercury in environmental samples and an elemental analysis to estimate organic and volatile carbon.

These devices are located in the clean rooms of modern facilities to prevent pollution.

“The Earth Surface Research Laboratory is a facility for the entire geoscience community on the island of Ireland to generate high quality data using the most advanced equipment currently available,” said Dr. John H. Snyder, new laboratory director. Michael Stoke said.

“Our dual goal is to support national efforts to understand Ireland’s natural environment and to build Ireland’s international reputation as a world – class geoscience research center. “

Researchers will use these tools to provide more information beyond geographical formation and physical history. By exploring the chemical makeup of Irish rocks, geographers can gain a deeper understanding of the country’s physical heritage and find ways to make sustainable use of natural resources.

Tellas – Geological Survey The lab will initially support the geochemical study of Ireland’s national project.

This facility is available to academic researchers and other environmental groups operating anywhere in Ireland on a non-commercial basis.

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“This very exciting collaboration will be greatly appreciated by the geoscience community on the island of Ireland,” said Professor David Chew, head of the geology department at Trinity College Dublin.

“The Geological Survey Ireland’s Tellus program and geoscience researchers will benefit from the high quality geochemical data produced by this state-of-the-art facility. “

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