Men found after 29 days lost at sea and having fun: ‘good break’

Men found after 29 days lost at sea and having fun: 'good break'

The GPS tracker they used stopped working when people on two Solomon Islands were lost at sea for 29 days. According to The Guardian, they were found in Papua New Guinea, 400 kilometers from their birthplace.

Live Nanchikana and Jr. Colony set sail from Mono Island in the Solomon Islands on the morning of September 3 in a small motor boat. They planned to travel 200 kilometers to the town of Noro on the island of New Georgia.

“We’ve traveled before, and that must be right,” Nanjikana said. However, the sea area in which they are located is usually unpredictable and violent, with only a few hours of travel, the couple encountered rain and strong winds, making it even more difficult to cross.

“When the bad weather came, it was bad, but it got worse, and when the GPS was‘ dead ’it was scary,” he said. “We could not see where we were going, so we decided to turn off the engine and wait to save fuel.”

നഞ്ചിക്കാന E The colony survived for about a month from the oranges they packed for the trip, collecting coconuts and rainwater, which they captured with a canvas. The rescue operation was carried out only when a fisherman was spotted off the coast of New Britain in Papua New Guinea.

“We didn’t know where we were, but we didn’t expect it to be in another country,” he said.

Arriving in the town of Pomio on October 2, they were very weak and in the following days were taken to a nearby house to seek medical attention from a local clinic. Joe Collio, an island resident, told the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corporation that the pair were doing well.

See also  Hong Kong teen activist detained for trying to seek asylum at US consulate

“I’m looking forward to going home, but I think it’s a good break from everything,” he commented. നഞ്ചിക്കാന

Mary Valennia, head of the Office of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Solomon Islands, based in Papua New Guinea, said the two were in contact with Nanjing to ensure arrangements for their return home.

Written By
More from Cheryl Hines
IYV: It’s too late to block China’s global influence
Media playback is not supported on your device Media caption“I can give...
Read More
Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *