Mars and the Moon are visiting tonight as the red planet has the closest approach to Earth

For years, Mars and the Moon have been meeting in the sky because the Red Planet has been closest to Earth for years.

  • Mars and the Moon will meet on Friday night starting at 11:35 p.m.
  • The Earth is preparing to pass between Mars and the Sun, bringing the planets closer together
  • People living in South America see the Moon and Mars deploying for a nigo
  • This month also marks a Blue Moon and Orinoid meteor shower

Mars and the Moon are getting ready to present a show that is out of this world.

The Red Planet takes the closest approach to Earth, and as the lunar orbit rises, the two appear to be hanging from each other in the night sky.

ET starts at 11:35 pm on Friday, October 2, and the closest approach can be seen shortly after midnight.

Both are visible from the east, but as the night progresses they move west and by 2am the ET pair will reach the highest points in the southern sky.

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Mars and the Moon are getting ready to present a show that is out of this world. The Red Planet takes the closest approach to Earth, and as the lunar orbit rises, the two appear to be hanging from each other in the night sky.

Accordingly Earthsky, People living in the southern part of the world will see the Moon closest to Mars.

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Residents of South America will obscure the mystery of Mars on Friday night and Saturday night.

Mars and the Moon will meet on October 13 as the Earth prepares to travel between the Red Planet and the Sun.

Every two years, Mars and Earth approach each other.

ET starts at 11:35 pm on Friday, October 2, and the closest approach can be seen shortly after midnight.  The incident took place in 2003.  The powerful telescope was able to capture an image of the lunar surface.

ET starts at 11:35 pm on Friday, October 2, and the closest approach can be seen shortly after midnight. The incident took place in 2003. The powerful telescope was able to capture an image of the lunar surface.

This is because Mars orbits the Sun every 26 months compared to Earth 12 – but the distance between them varies each time.

This brings Mars into opposition to our skies every two years, Earthsky reports, and will be in opposition on October 14th.

The brightness of Mars will not be seen for another 15 years.

October is a universe of wonder as stargazers prepare for a feast this month as hundreds of shooting stars light up the sky during the Orionid meteor shower.

These meteorites fly through the sky every October 2 to November 7 – but most can be seen on the morning of October 21st.

This cosmic event occurs as the Earth passes through the remnants of Comet Halley, the parent comet of the Orionid Shower.

Astronomers estimate that meteorites can travel up to 148,000 miles per hour into the atmosphere, but leave gas trails in the sky that last only a few seconds.

NASA considers Orionids to be the most beautiful rain this year, appearing in the northern and southern hemispheres after midnight.

This month brings the rare Blue Moon that appears in all time zones.

Our lunar neighbor does not glow blue, but is named because it is the second full moon to appear in the same month – the first occurring on October 1st.

The cosmic display occurs seven times every 19 years, meaning the world will not see the next one until October 31, 2039.

What makes this event even more rare is that it has been seen in all parts of the world for the first time since World War II.

People from North and South America can see the Blue Moon, along with people from India, Europe and Asia.

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