Cameroonian journalist sentenced to 23 months in prison after serving 2 years in prison

Cameroonian journalist sentenced to 23 months in prison after serving 2 years in prison

Social media giant Facebook on Friday rejected a request by an Irish court to block an Irish regulator’s probe into the possible transfer of data from the European Union to the United States.

The Irish High Court agreed in September to suspend the Data Protection Commission (DPC) investigation. But on Friday, they announced that they would reject the claims of the American group.

“I reject any claim from Facebook Ireland,” said High Court Judge David Barniville.

A decision welcomed by the regulator, in a brief statement to the AFP, may prompt the DPC to block the transfer of personal data from Facebook to the United States, from Facebook, which is at the heart of the economic model.

Facebook has competed with DPC’s, which is the equivalent of the French CNL, which seems ready to challenge the system used by the American group to transfer users’ data from one continent to another.

The Irish regulator, which oversees Facebook for the European Union, has a regional headquarters in Ireland and has acted in the context of a strong decision by the European justice system.

In July, fears about U.S. surveillance programs led to the repeal of a key mechanism called the Private Data Privacy Shield by the European Union.

American companies using the “Privacy Shield” can go backwards through another European data transfer mechanism, the Standard Contractual Close (SCC), like Facebook.

But the DPC said the new system would have no legal basis. They then launched an investigation on August 28.

“The DPC (which can block Facebook data transfer from the EU to Facebook data transfer within two months) after eight years of action,” said Max Shrems, quoting the social network’s complaint and origin. Long-term connection to the social network founded by Mark Zuckerberg.

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The image of the fight for the protection of personal data, the NGO “Noib” (your business is nothing), this “David” facing the digital giant wanted to disrupt the flow of data between the European headquarters Facebook and home – the mother in California believing that personal data is best protected in Europe.

Facebook spokespersons for AFP did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

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