Astronomers report black hole eruption 16 times longer than full moon

Astronomers report black hole eruption 16 times longer than full moon

Centaurus A12 is an active elliptical galaxy about 12 million light-years away. At its core is a black hole weighing 55 million suns. In this image, the galaxy is imaged at radio wavelengths, revealing large plasma slices reaching beyond the visible galaxy and occupying only a small space in the center of the image. The background points are not stars, but radio galaxies similar to Centaurus A. Authors: Ben McKinley, ICRAR / Curtin, Louisiana State University Connor Matern.

Astronomers have created the most comprehensive picture of radioactivity from the nearest supermassive black hole that feeds the Earth.


The emission is caused by a central black hole in the Centaurus galaxy, about 12 million light-years away.

When a black hole gives off falling gas, it displaces matter at the speed of light, causing “radio bubbles” to grow for hundreds of millions of years.

Seen from Earth, the eruption of Centaurus A is now eight degrees in the sky, with 16 full moms standing side by side.

Photographed using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) Telescope on the outskirts of Western Australia.

The study was published in the journal Today Natural astronomy.

The main author is Dr. Kett Benjamin McKinley, of the International Radio Astronomy Research Center (ICRAR) at Curtin University, said the film reveals amazing new details about radio radiation from the galaxy.

“these Radio waves It is derived from substances that are absorbed Large black hole In the center of the galaxy.

“It forms a disk around a black hole, and when the material separates near a black hole, strong nozzles form on either side of it, pushing most objects into space, perhaps a million light-years away.

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Video showing Radioactive Galaxy Centaurus A, a nearby black hole actively feeding the Earth. The video shows the galaxy’s visible wavelength at light and X – rays, less than a millimeter from the Moon. It is then scaled to show the size of the surrounding bubbles observed at the radio wavelength. Astronomers have created the most comprehensive picture of radioactivity from the nearest supermassive black hole that feeds the Earth. Learn more at www.icrar.org/centaurus. Attribution: ESO / WFI (Optical) – MPIfR / ESO / APEX / A. Weiss et al. (Less than one millimeter) – NASA / CXC / CfA / R.Kraft et al. (X-Ray) – Ben McKinley, ICRAR / Curtin, Conor Mathen, Louisiana State University (Radio).

“Previous radio observations could not cope with the high brightness of the nozzles and distorted the details of a large area of ​​the galaxy, but our new image overcomes these limitations.

Centaurus A is the closest radioactive galaxy to our Milky Way galaxy.

“We can learn a lot from Centauro A, because it’s so close, we see it in so much detail,” he said. McKinley said.

“Not just radio wavelengths, but all other wavelengths of light.

“In this study, we were able to combine radio observations with optical and X – ray data to better understand the physics of these massive black holes.

Astrophysics Dr. Massimo Gaspari of the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics said the study confirms a new theory called “chotic cold accretion” (CCA) that has emerged in various fields.

Centaurus A12 is an active elliptical galaxy about 12 million light-years away. At its core is a black hole weighing 55 million suns. This composite image shows the galaxy at different wavelengths and the surrounding intergalactic space. Radio plasma is shown in blue and appears to interact with hot X-ray gas (orange) and cold neutral hydrogen (purple). Half (red) clouds appear above the optical part of the main galaxy, located between two bright radio points. The background is visible at the optical wavelength, and the stars in our Milky Way galaxy are already visible in the foreground. Authors: Connor Materne, Louisiana State University (Optical / Halwa), Kraft et al. (X-ray), Strow et al. (Hello), Ben McKinley, ICRAR / Cortisone. (Radio).

“In this model, the cold gas clouds in the galaxy’s halo condense and fall in the central regions, which feed into a vast black hole,” he said.

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“Because of this rain, the black hole reacts aggressively, emitting energy back through a radio jet that blows up the stunning slices we see in the MWA photo. This study is one of the first to look at a multi-phase “air” CCA-like detail across the entire balance set, “said Dr. Gaspari.

Dr. McKinley said the galaxy appears brighter in the center, where it is more active and has a lot of energy.

“Then with your exit it will be weak, because the energy is gone and everything is fine,” he said.

“But there are some interesting advantages when the charged particles accelerate and interact with strong magnetic fields.”

MWA Director Professor Stephen Tinge said the study was made possible by the wide view of the telescope, excellent silent radio location, and excellent sensitivity.

Astronomers report black hole eruption 16 times longer than full moon

The 107 tile, or “outer” part of the 256 MWA, is located 1.5 km from the center of the telescope. MWA is SKA’s predecessor. Attribution: Pete Wheeler, ICRAR

The MWA is the forerunner of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), a global initiative to build the world’s largest radio telescopes in Western Australia and South Africa, “he said.

“The broader perspective and therefore the larger amount of data we can collect means that the detection potential of each MWA monitor is much higher. This is a great step towards higher SKA. ”


Rectangular astronomers explore the chambers of giant black holes


More info:

B. McKinley et al., Multiple feedback and nutrition on the nearest radioactive galaxy Centaurus A, Natural astronomy (2021 m) DOI: 10.1038 / s41550-021-01553-3

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Submitted by the International Radio Astronomical Research Center

Quote: Astronomers film a black hole eruption 16 times from the full moon in the sky (December 22, 2021). December 22 from https://phys.org/news/2021-12-astronomers-capture-black -hole- eruption. Programming language

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