Ancient Egyptian Addiction to Cats: Some Colossal Details Revealed

Ancient Egyptian Addiction to Cats: Some Colossal Details Revealed

Why did the ancient Egyptians like cats? From statues to cattle ornaments to mummifications, the pharaohs’ obsession with cats has been with us for millennia. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, the Egyptians shaved their eyebrows as a sign of respect when they mourned the loss of a family cat.

Mummies of cats and rare beetles found in Egyptian tombs

Although they were kept indoors because of their ability to hunt rats and snakes, the ancient Egyptians worshiped their gods. <പൂച്ചകളുടെ ഗുണങ്ങൾ> Much of this devotion was supposed to exist: on the one hand they were protectors, on the other hand they were loyal and nurturing, and they could be fighting, free and cruel. These traits seem to make cats look very special in the eyes of the ancient Egyptians, the “personality” of the god, to love and fear at the same time with his whip and tail.


Cats were so popular that the ancient Egyptians called or nicknamed children after domestic cats. Apparently the most famous is Mit, which means cat. The oldest cat cemetery ever found dates back to 3800 BC. However, some research suggests that this addiction is not always compassionate and affectionate – there is evidence of a more vicious and commercial side.

Excavations have uncovered evidence of ancient farms, which may have been killed and mummified at an early age, placed in the tombs of the wealthy as a means of pleasing the gods or asking for help.

Ancient Egyptian Addiction to Cats: Some Colossal Details Revealed

X-rays of mummies at Swansea University in Great Britain also show this. “We found out before the X-ray image that the cat was very young and dead: from the bone shape, he was only less than 5 months old, and his neck was intentionally broken,” explains Professor Richard Johnston. “It was a shock.”

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