A Stanford study found that fatigue with magnification is real and bad for women. Why here

A Stanford study found that fatigue with magnification is real and bad for women.  Why here

The work and personal lives of people captured during the COVID-19 epidemic of video calls, according to a new study, have affected companies, especially women, from transitioning from meeting to virtual. The study at Stanford University aims to be the first large-scale study to fully examine magnifying fatigue. Jeff Hancock, a communications professor at Stanford University, told KCRA3 that magnifying fatigue is different from face-to-face meetings or phone calls. In his opinion, one of them is the “mirror” effect. “We went through face-to-face conversations with people and, in fact, there is a mirror right next to the face of the person we are looking at,” he said. He said the mirrors were not stretched until about 200 years ago. “Now we see them talking to our friends, family and colleagues, which is worrying,” he said. “It allows you to constantly think about yourself or ignore someone else if you do not see what you want.” All of these things can lead to depression. Hawk said the mirror effect is considered the biggest difficulty for women because their glasses are a little more worrying. One in 7 women – 13.8%. – Compared to one in 20 men – 5.5% – states that they feel very “tired” “after getting close”. “Women take short breaks as they grow up. We didn’t expect that,” Hancock said. Disadvantages of virtual encounters. “Well, now I have to stay in this locker. This is a camera. Unlike a normal meeting, I can not move or walk or speed, so a lot of people say they’m physically stuck,” Hancock said. “It’s very tiring, especially for young people.” Another drawback is the hyper look, and if you meet a lot of people, you feel that not everyone is watching you, even when you are not talking. It’s raining, and it’s a little close. We feel physically excited. “Doing so for a long time will make us very tired.” People who use video conferencing can also “ask for a real tax” for concerns about how you move your hand to speak and other voluntary actions you take personally. According to the study, working item organizations can reduce magnification fatigue: Execute days without videos. Take a day off every day without the need for video conferencing. If video conferencing is not required, turn off the video for this meeting. People need to think carefully about whether they need a video in a meeting, or make forced video calls so that no one feels the pressure to keep it. If your employees or co-workers are tired, pick it up. Ask your employees to adopt the Stanford Zed Scale, which will help them measure and reduce their fatigue. This story was produced as part of the KCRA 3 COVID-19 Now and Next special report. Tune in to Thursdays at 7:30 pm on KCRA.com on TV or online.

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According to a new study, video calls captured people’s work and personal lives during the COVID-19 epidemic, and the transition from face-to-face meetings to virtual life has affected society, especially women.

Stanford University Research The goal is to conduct the first large-scale study to fully examine zoom fatigue.

Jeff Hancock, a communications professor at Stanford University, told KCRA3 that zooming is different from regular face-to-face meetings or phone calls.

In his opinion, one of them is the “mirror” effect.

“We went through face-to-face conversations with people and, in fact, there is a mirror right next to the face of the person we are looking at,” he said.

He said the mirrors were not stretched until about 200 years ago.

“Now we see them talking to our friends, family and colleagues, which is worrying,” he said. “It allows you to constantly think about yourself or ignore the other person if you do not see what you want.”

All of these things can lead to fatigue.

Hancock said the mirror effect is considered the biggest problem for women, because “the mirror makes them a little more anxious.”

At the end of the approach, the researchers found that 1 – 13.8% of the total 7 women – 1 – 5.5% of the 20 men.

Hancock said: “Women took short breaks between their deaths. We did not expect that. “We think they need to pay more attention to children and home care, so they may be trying to move their approach forward, which is another reason why they are so tired.”

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Hancock said there are other disadvantages to virtual encounters that men and women experience, such as physical restraint.

“Okay, now I have to stay in this locker, this is a camera. Unlike a normal meeting, I can not move, walk or speed, which is why a lot of people say they are physically trapped, ”Hancock said. “It’s exhausting, especially for young people.”

Another disadvantage is hyper-view, if you meet a lot of people, even when you are not talking, you feel that not everyone is watching you.

Hancock said, “It’s the kind of emotion you look at, and it’s a little bit closer. We’m physically excited.” “Doing this for a long time really makes us tired.”

Hank said worrying about how your hands will move can lead to conversation and other common attempts that usually occur in meetings between people.

According to the study, action line organizations can reduce expansion fatigue:

  • Implement meeting days without video. Have a day every day for a week without the need for video conferencing.
  • If video conferencing is not required, turn off the video for this meeting. People need to think carefully about whether a video is needed in a meeting, otherwise, it is imperative to turn off the video so that no one feels the pressure to keep it.
  • Find out if your employees or co-workers are tired. Take your employees Stanford Stairs ZEF Measure their fatigue and find a way to avoid it.

This story was produced as part of the KCRA 3 COVID-19 Now and Next special report. Tune in to Thursdays at 7:30 pm on KCRA.com on TV or online.

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