A nuance is needed to solve the Irish problems

A nuance is needed to solve the Irish problems

Lynn Cantwell believes Ireland will have to rely on cross-country athletes from short to medium, as it will take time for grassroots talent to reach the top of the game.

When the semi-pros vs. amateurs came forward after Ireland’s 41-point defeat to France over the weekend, there were several factors to play out, with only a handful of Ireland playing in the top fifteen. Juvenile. Rugby with most sporting changes as you age.

France, meanwhile, had a team with years of experience, and there was a huge gap between the capabilities of both teams at the start of the game.

In an ideal world, all actors in the use of Adam Griggs would have years of experience, but not now, believing the former center that caution is needed to solve problems. Different problems.

“Talent transfer, I think we should accept it,” Cantwell, Ireland’s most capped international player, told the RTE rugby podcast.

“A lot of basketball, football and hockey players play rugby for a while because women’s sports are from the grassroots.

“So these hard-working athletes now come from other sports – that’s okay.”

Cantwell, who will soon travel to South Africa to take on the role of best woman manager, ressed that a number of issues need to be addressed, including better issues as Ireland seeks to bridge the gap between France and England. For the current crop of Ireland International.

She added: “We need to try to lead women in this transition who do not know how to be professional in sports and do not know many of them.”

See also  Jupiter's moons are hotter than ever. They heat each other

“A semi-professional role model can be a positive role model because people with a career have a lot of value, and growth from the pitch is important.

“But you have to try to focus on the skills out there so that you can assign them to present them immediately and give a visionary perspective on the girls who see the sport.

“In our view, there is an element of patience: we need to give girls time to grow and become great athletes.

Do they have the capacity to do that? Do structures and resources exist?


Fitzspatrick: The main culture of French conquest


“It’s nice that they did 20 weeks of training with Covid, but are they refusing and holding weekly skill sessions with trainers in their continents to develop their skills?

“Do they have this power and conditioning facilities, do they have local centers? Why aren’t girls trained at academies like Leinster and Munster? ”

“Is there a good system in Ireland that allows girls to perform?”

Listen to the RT Rugby podcast Podcast AppleAnd SoundCloudAnd Spotify Or get your podcasts somewhere.

Follow Ireland vs. Italy (Saturday 12:00) via our live blog on RTE.ie and RTÉ News App, or watch live broadcast on RTÉ2 or RTÉ Player, and listen live on RTÉ Radio 1 Extra.

Written By
More from Scout Mitchell
Ireland, Hungary and Estonia say “no” to the global IRC
The three member states of the European Union (EU) are Ireland, Hungary...
Read More
Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *